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THE HATFIELD PRIZE

The Hatfield Prize is awarded annually to three student-faculty pairs from Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) schools.

Each pair conducts research on a social policy that impacts the well-being of children, families, and communities. This semester-long research project culminates in a policy report published by the Center for Public Justice.


Why Apply? Student Prize winners will:

  • Receive a $5,000 Prize

  • Conduct academic research and write a policy report to be published by the Center for Public Justice

  • Integrate your faith with a justice issue that you care about

  • Work closely with an academic advisor to conduct thorough research

  • Receive editorial support and policy expertise from the Center for Public Justice team

  • Be connected with opportunities to present your research at relevant conferences and other appropriate venues

 
The 2019 Hatfield Prize recipients.

The 2019 Hatfield Prize recipients.

Apply by midnight on Sunday, November 10.

(Note: The original deadline of October 31 has been extended) 


A TRANSFORMATIVE ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE

Receiving the Hatfield Prize and working with CPJ and my faculty advisor was one of the most empowering and impactful experiences of my four years in college.

The Hatfield Prize is open to juniors and seniors enrolled at Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) institutions in the United States. Students are required to partner with a faculty advisor who will support their research and writing. The Prize will be awarded to three student-faculty pairs. Students receive a $5,000 award; faculty advisors receive a $1,500 award. 

Students will conduct research on a social challenge that is impacting the well-being of children and families in their community. The research, which will be published by the Center for Public Justice, will examine the issue at a national level and will situate it within their local context through conducting original interviews and research in their own backyard. 

Priority will be given to applications that propose innovative research on domestic social policy issues that include, but are not limited to: the social safety net (ex. TANF, WIC, SNAP, public charge, public housing), criminal justice and/or juvenile justice reform, foster care, family caregiving, and predatory lending. The Center for Public Justice is especially interested in research proposals that highlight the ways in which government and faith-based organizations are partnering to promote child and family well-being.


ADVANCE PUBLIC JUSTICE IN YOUR COMMUNITY

In every corner of America, children and families are playing, caregiving, learning, working, and worshipping. Yet we know that throughout different seasons of life, families face real burdens, barriers, and struggles. The barriers to flourishing are the product of environment, experiences, and often, injustice. 

Receiving the Hatfield Prize has majorly influenced my decision to continue on with education and research.

Through the Hatfield Prize, students have the opportunity to integrate their faith with substantive academic research and to publish a policy report that will be used by peers, professors, practitioners, pastors, and policymakers. Students will explore questions like: What does it mean for our families and neighborhoods to flourish? How do we, as Christians, honor the God-given dignity and potential that we know is inherent in every person? What societal structures and policies are essential to well-being? 

The Center for Public Justice, through The Hatfield Prize, is interested in supporting students conducting innovative research that imagines a society in which all children and families thrive in the way that God intended them to and that identifies practical and concrete ways for us, collectively, to get there. 


THE RESEARCH PROCESS AND REPORT

  • Students will work closely with their faculty advisor and the Center for Public Justice team throughout the spring semester. This includes an orientation to become acquainted with the Center for Public Justice and its expectations for the research.

  • Student-faculty pairs are required to have a monthly meeting via phone/video conference with the Center for Public Justice team to discuss their ongoing research and writing.

  • Students will be responsible for completing multiple rounds of revisions on their written work.

  • There are two final products:

    • A 7,500-10,000 word policy report that is accessible to a wide audience, including peers, professors, pastors, practitioners, and policymakers.

    • A 1,000 word op-ed to be published on Shared Justice, the Center for Public Justice’s online publication for Christian 20- and 30-somethings.

  • The Center for Public Justice will work with recipients to identify appropriate venues for presenting their research. Past Prize recipients have presented their research in a variety of settings, including but not limited to: The Christians in Political Science Conference, The Henry Symposium on Religion and Public Life, and the Texas Hunger Initiative’s Together at the Table: Hunger & Poverty Summit.

The 2019 Hatfield Prize Reports.

The 2019 Hatfield Prize Reports.


PUT YOUR CITIZENSHIP INTO PRACTICE

2019 recipients Shannon Que and Abigail Stevens present their research at the Henry Symposium on Religion and Public Life.

2019 recipients Shannon Que and Abigail Stevens present their research at the Henry Symposium on Religion and Public Life.

Students will utilize a public justice framework to communicate their research and recommendations. Public justice is the guiding principle for government’s work. This framework, as articulated by the Center for Public Justice holds that “Government is authorized by God to promote what is good for human flourishing” and is uniquely tasked to promote policies that contribute to the common good. However, public justice also requires that government upholds “the ability of other institutions and associations to make their full contributions to human flourishing”; in other words, government must be committed to institutional pluralism, recognizing that many of the most formative institutions of which we are a part — like the family, Church, faith-based and nonprofit organizations, and businesses — all uniquely contribute to human flourishing. 


2018 recipients Dr. Paul Brink and Jordan Bellamy (Gordon College).  Photo by Mark Spooner.

2018 recipients Dr. Paul Brink and Jordan Bellamy (Gordon College). Photo by Mark Spooner.

FACULTY ADVISOR EXPECTATIONS

1. Provide your student with your CV and a 500 word or less statement answering: “Why are you interested in participating in this research? How do you intend to support your student in his or her research ” This will be included in your student’s application package.

2. Attendance at orientation (details forthcoming).

3. A commitment to guide the student in their research from December to May 2020. This includes meeting monthly with the student, assisting the student in engaging with stakeholders in community, and providing resources and editorial feedback throughout their research and report writing process.

3. Communicate with the Center for Public Justice team every other month via phone or video conference.

The Hatfield Prize was a unique opportunity to support the spiritual and intellectual development of an exceptional student ... to serve others through policy research.

FAQs

What is the Center for Public Justice?

The Center for Public Justice is an independent, nonpartisan organization devoted to policy research and civic education. Our mission is to equip citizens, develop leaders, and shape policy in pursuit of our purpose to serve God, advance justice, and transform public life. Shared Justice, which runs The Hatfield Prize, is the Center for Public Justice’s initiative for Christian 20- and 30-somethings.

Who is the prize named after?

The Hatfield Prize is named in honor of the late Senator Mark O. Hatfield, who served as a United States senator from Oregon for three decades, and was known for his principled Christian faith and for his commitment to working across difference to find common ground. Read more about Senator Hatfield here.

What HAPPENS AFTER I SUBMIT MY APPLICATION?

The Center for Public Justice will review applications and conduct phone interviews with finalists. You will receive an email confirming receipt of your application.

What is the time commitment for the hatfield prize?

The Hatfield Prize requires a significant time commitment from both students and faculty advisors. Applicants should view the time commitment as comparable to that of an independent study. Unlike a report or paper submitted for a class, students will be required to make several rounds of revisions on their reports. Students should also anticipate spending a significant amount of time in the community interviewing relevant stakeholders.

Who is eligible to apply?

To apply, students must be a junior or senior with a GPA of 3.5 or above at a CCCU member school, and must be enrolled as a full-time student in the spring 2020 semester. Students of all majors are invited to apply.

I am a student at a CCCU member school in canada. can i apply?

Unfortunately the scope of this research project is limited to social safety net programs in the United States. 

Will there be an opportunity to present my research?

The Center for Public Justice will work with students to identify appropriate venues and conferences for presenting their research. Past Prize recipients have presented their research in a variety of settings, including but not limited to: The Christians in Political Science Conference, The Henry Symposium on Religion and Public Life, and the Texas Hunger Initiative’s Together at the Table: Hunger & Poverty Summit.

Questions? Contact Katie Thompson, Program Director of Shared Justice, at katie.thompson@cpjustice.org


WITH THANKS

The Hatfield Prize is made possible through the generosity of the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust.

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